Selling watch repairs is like selling internal surgery — you can’t show the customer what’s going to occur inside. But if you have some old watches, the following technique will surely increase watch repair sales, profits and closing ratios.

First, buy six broken watches: two mechanical wind, two self-winding and two battery-operated.

Then, buy a large picture frame and a piece of foam. Take apart the watches and take off the bands. Place on top of the foam one of the mechanical watches with an open back, and below it separate out all of the parts of the matching watch. Now viewers can see what the completed watch looks like, as well as all of its individual parts. Next to this, do the same for the auto-wind watches and the battery-operated watches. Put a glass frame over the entire display.

Now you have something to use when training your staff, and the staff can use it for watch intake and presentations with customers. Train your staff how to show the customer what potential problems can occur and teach them typically what breaks.

Train your employees to know that if a customer asks, “Why so much?” they can show them that the watchmaker has to examine 50-plus pieces just to see what the problem is. He must then clean all the parts and put them back together again.

I’d suggest using the Geller Blue Book just to give customers a range of what the repair could cost. This will make your staff feel and act confident, and you’ll get higher closing ratios for estimates. For example, they might say: “This could cost between $135 and $225 dollars; if it’s more than that, we’ll call. Shall we proceed and give this to the watchmaker?”

This alone will save the store and watchmaker the grief of calling and waiting for approvals on watch repair estimates.

Now you’ve got a tried-and-true method of closing full price watch repairs — and all it took were some broken watches and a few supplies from the craft store.

DAVID GELLER is a consultant to jewelers on store management. Email him at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


This article originally appeared in the January 2018 edition of INSTORE.

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